Thursday, September 11, 2008

Blog #4

Summary Lead:
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/nation/bal-anniversary0911,0,3573541.story
"U.S. marks 7th anniversary of 9/11 attacks"

WASHINGTON - President Bush said today that history will look back at America's response to the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and conclude that "we did not tire, we did not falter and we did not fail."

Short Report/ Brief:
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/nyregionspecial2/index.html
"New Season That's Rich in the Mix"

Diversity rules this season in the outstanding array of exhibitions at art museums in the suburbs of New York City.

What is a lead?

A lead is a short summary serving as an introduction to a news story or article. It is a brief and powerful statement that shares the stories most essential facts. A lead should contain the 5 W's and H although sometimes it is impossible to do so. The typical structure to a lead involves the subject coming first, followed by a verb as to what the subject did, and ends with an object. There are four guidelines to summary leads. You must first be specific as possible. Only include the most important and interesting aspects of the news story in order to really capture your audiences' attention. Next, you must avoid backing in, or rather placing an introductory clause or phrase before the subject. Another guideline is to be concise. Don't put too much information into one article's lead. A rule of thumb is that sentences that run not more that 30 words are good. Last, use active voice. This will increase the odds of the writer grabbing the readers' attention. In order to do this you must make sure that in your lead the subject is undertaking an action.

What is a short report?

A short report is different from a lead. A short report is sometimes referred to as a brief. They both bring readers summaries of interesting stories that don't deserve or really need to be full stories. They usually contain 1-3 sentences because there may not be enough details to construct a full news article. Tense is very important in short reports or briefs. You can use present tense, past perfect tense, or the future/ infinitive tense. In briefs and short stories no time element will appear because it can be assumed that the action or particular announcement has just recently taken place.

3 comments:

jatwater said...

Hi Jenny,
Think about more informative headlines for your blog posts rather than just Blog #1 or #2. Remember, your headline should draw your reader in. You should also be posting pictures to your blog whenever possible.

rachel rothwell said...

Good examples of summary ledes and short reports with links but maybe next time write shorter and exlcude your examples in the definition

Anomaly said...

I agree with Prof. Atwater when she comments on your titles. If i didn't already read the blog, I wouldn't have known what it was about based on the name. Other than that I think your blog was well structured. It clearly explained each term and examples were given.